Our Clinic Professional Profiles
Facts & Figures How we Hear Tinnitus Types of Hearing Loss
Case History Ear Examination Hearing Test Results Explained Further Examination
Introduction Hearing Aid Technology Styles of Hearing Aids Hearing Aid Makes Financial Assistance Other Listening Devices Accessories
Introduction Noise Induced Hearing Loss Custom Moulded Hearing Protection Workers Musicians Concert Goers Personal Music Players Shooters Motorsports & Bikers Swimmers, Surfers & Kayakers Kids
Introduction Health & Safety Regulations Hearing Conservation Programmes Noise Survey & Risk Assessment Audiometric Hearing Testing Programme On-Site Mobile Testing Unit Custom Moulded Hearing Protection
Digital Hearing Aids Hearing Protection Occupational Hearing
Digital Hearing Aids
Hearing Protection
Occupational Hearing Conservation
Click here to check your hearing.
Click here to view our special offers.
Click here to view the latest news from Hearing Healthcare Ireland.
Click here to book your free hearing test... today!

Hearing Test & Consultation

Step 4: Your Results Explained

An audiogram shows your hearing ability by showing your hearing threshold at different frequencies. Hearing threshold is an indication of how soft a sound may get before it is inaudible. A hearing threshold of between 0 and 20 dB is considered normal.

Audiogram - hearing test result

The vertical axis of the audiogram represents sound volume or intensity which is measured in decibels (dB). The more one moves down the axis, the louder the sound becomes. This corresponds to turning up the volume on a radio, for example. Zero decibels at the top of the axis represent the softest sound a person is normally able to hear.

The horizontal axis of the audiogram represents sound frequency or pitch measured in Hertz (Hz). Sound frequency increases gradually the further one moves to the right along the axis. This movement can be compared to playing on the left side of a piano and gradually moving to the right side where the tone becomes more and more high-pitched. Frequencies between 500 Hz and 4000 Hz are most commonly used during ordinary conversation.

<-- Previous Page | Next Page -->